EcoPsychology
Do you have a nourishing, stabilizing relationship with the more-than-human world through animal friends, hiking, camping,
birdwatching, farming, hunting, photography or other activities that bring you close to nature? As your therapist, Maggie would
encourage you to recognize the natural world's importance in making you a whole and happy person. Humans today have the same
genetic structure as our ancient ancestors had when our species first emerged on this earth. Yet life today is nothing like it was when
the first people roamed the land in small family groups and took their living directly from what they found in nature.

People were not made to be separate from nature, but embedded in it, as much as a cactus is part of the desert or a rhododendron of a
coastal redwood forest. And in fact, we are reminded by recent increases in extreme weather that our lives still depend on the natural
world.

In a time when nature is receding and becoming less healthy, our bodies feel the disturbance. We may feel anxious or insecure, and
not know why. We may sense that something is missing, and something is: the diversity of species with whom we once shared this
planet. How we come to terms with the degradation of our biosphere greatly influences our capacity for joy and fulfillment.